Tag Archives: prepper

Gulf coast weather tracking

 

99 - PREDICTED TRACKS

Spaghetti model track  storm 99

If you live anywhere on the Gulf coast, this weather site is an absolute must.

The absolutely most comprehensive storm and event tracking site out there

Reams and reams of info

Plus some of the coolest Hi- res earth photos ever seen

Trust me on this one, it is the only hurricane season resource I use

The Golden Triangle weather page Here:http://www.beaumontweather.com/

8 Days Left to Sign Up-Feeding Your Tribe Now,and During A SHTF Event

“Learn the procedures and techniques to safely feed your tribe  under    any conditions-and provide proper nutrition needed,as people will be under stress and healthy,great tasting food not only boosts morale,it helps your tribe fight off diseases,and keeps everyone in top physical and   mental shape.

You can send one member of your tribe to take the course,and they can relay the information to the rest of your group.Your team,tribe,group,clan whatever you call them can’t survive for long eating MRE’s,beans and rice-learn how to keep everyone well fed, good food keeps everyone mentally and physically healthy,fewer people will succumb to colds,flu and other diseases that will run rampant in any long term grid down scenario.

One of the things that people often do not consider important is feeding your tribe,group,clan,team ,etc. as a group.

Cooking for large groups of people is not like having a backyard BBQ,or a holiday meal at your aunt Millie’s house.

There’s procedures you have to follow-just like anything else,there’s a right way and a wrong way to do things.

Do things the wrong way,and everyone you just fed will be grabbing the TP and running to the nearest toilet-or to the woods for the next 24-48hours.

I spent over 20 years as a professional chef,I was the executive chef at private country clubs and first class hotels.

I also cooked for an outfitter on backcountry elk hunts,cooking for the hunters, the guides,and the rest of the staff way back in the mountains,it was usually a 2 day horseback ride to get to camp.

I spent a couple years working fishing boats out of Wanchese N.C. and working for the fish companies on the docks unloading boats and cutting fish.

I am offering a series of 3 classes on cooking for large groups of people,both under “normal” conditions,and in SHTF

events with no power,and no natural gas to operate stoves and ovens.

I’ve taught cooking classes in the past-my boss at the time volunteered me to teach the class,at the request of the hotel’s general manager.

I’ m going to use the same methods I used back then,except rather than a 3 day series of classes,I’m going to condense the three days of classes into a one day class.

I will do a series of three classes,each one building on the previous class material,so the classes have to be taken in order,you have to have completed the first class to be able to take the second class an so on.

If there is interest in more advanced classes-I will offer those as well.

Here’s the description of what I will cover in the first class…

Cooking For Large Groups”

From Here:http://starvinlarry.com/learn-the-procedures-and-techniques-to-safely-feed-your-tribe-under-any-conditions-and-provide-proper-nutrition-neededas-people-will-be-under-stress-and-healthygreat-tasting-food-not-only-boosts/

Trust me, it is not going to be the Sunday barbeque

There is a reason that they have cooking courses called ” Industrial cooking” that are year long classes

This is something really worthwhile and priced right

 

Ghost cities of China: How China still has 7% growth

“Little did we know that most of that iron ore being shipped to Guangzhou from Rio de Janeiro and Port Hedland, Australia was going to build Chinese cities; cities that would remain vacant for years. China single-handedly topped the phrase “bridge to nowhere” and made ghost cities a euphemism for lousy development planning in the world’s No. 2 economy. Anyone can build a useless overpass, but it takes China to build a city for a million people with no buyers in sight.

The naysayers loved the Western media’s discovery of China’s ghost cities. It was evidence that China’s growth of the last 20 years was based on building things nobody needed or wanted. This was planned obsolescence on a grand scale. And now that the economy is slowing, what will become of those cities? Many of them are debt burdens carried by the developers who haven’t sold a single unit.

From shopping malls to soccer stadiums, hundreds of new cities in China are largely empty. And yet more cities are still being built deep in the heart of the country. All in hopes that its rural population will one day move to a flat in a city without a mayor. It’s plausible, of course. That’s because over the next 15 years, the country’s urban population will be 1 billion; three times that of the United States.”

What will become of these cities going forward? Here’s a quick answer: a handful might be shuttered. Most will be filled. New ones will undoubtedly be built.

China’s developing its urban architecture three ways: new cities (xinshi), new districts (xinqu) and the so-called townification (chengzhenhua). Townification is quite a departure from the way Chinese cities have developed to date. This is the transformation of small rural centers and even tribal villages and building a small urban center around them. The Communist Party planners in Beijing want to urbanize over 100 million rural Chinese over the next five years alone. That would require the construction of 50 Bostons, or six Shanghais, by 2020. Townification is lower intensity than that. These are small cities rather than sky scraper zones designed to house suits and high heels. It’s more widespread than traditional urbanization, and will define the way China develops socioeconomically over the coming years.

Roughly 40% of the 300 million Chinese expected to move into a city by 2030 will mostly be moving to smaller cities in the “chengzhenhua” system. Rather than migrating to cities, the cities will be built around them instead.”

http://www.forbes.com/sites/kenrapoza/2015/07/20/what-will-become-of-chinas-ghost-cities/

Everything is better in Europe China

If we need growth, why don’t we just model our economy after Europe China?

After all the Chinese model is working out so well

Inspsectapedia- Diagnose and repair it yourself guide for anything from A/C to wells

You should really check this site out, there is a wealth of information on it

I am only disappointed that it took me this long to find it

I could have saved myself some money last year on A/C repairs

I am a service tech and run a service oriented business

I hate to call a repair service

http://inspectapedia.com/index.php

China’s is the First Central Bank to Lose Control… It Won’t Be the Last

“The Big Crisis, the one in which entire countries go bust, has begun. It will not unfold in a matter of weeks; these sorts of things take months to complete. But it has begun.

ALL of the so called, “economic recovery” that began in 2009 has been based on the Central Banks’ abilities to rein in the collapse.

The first round of interventions (2007-early 2009) was performed in the name of saving the system. The second round (2010-2012) was done because it was generally believed that the first round hadn’t completed the task of getting the world back to recovery.

However, from 2012 onward, everything changed. At that point the Central Banks went “all in” on the Keynesian lunacy that they’d been employing since 2008. We no longer had QE plans with definitive deadlines. Instead phrases like “open-ended” and doing “whatever it takes” began to emanate from Central Bankers’ mouths.

However, the insanity was in fact greater than this. It is one thing to bluff your way through the weakest recovery in 80+ years with empty promises; but it’s another thing entirely to roll the dice on your entire country’s solvency just to see what happens.

In 2013, the Bank of Japan launched a single QE program equal to 25% of Japan’s GDP. This was unheard of in the history of the world. Never before had a country spent so much money relative to its size so rapidly… and with so little results: a few quarters of increased economic growth while household spending collapsed and misery rose alongside inflation.

This was the beginning of the end. Japan nearly broke its bond market launching this program (the circuit breakers tripped multiple times in that first week). However it wasn’t until last month that things truly became completely and utterly broken.

A month or so ago,  China lost control of its stock market. Despite freezing the market, banning short-selling, arresting short-sellers, and injecting billions of Dollars per day into the markets, China’s stock market continues to implode.

Please let this sink in: a Central bank, indeed, one of the largest, most important Central Banks, has officially “lost control.”

The rest here from Zero hedge :http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-08-21/chinas-first-central-bank-lose-control%E2%80%A6-it-wont-be-last

I seriously think that we are past the point that any of this can be stopped. We are in for the ride at some point in time and it is going to be a matter not when, but rather, how bad

Just remember that no matter how bad things are, wartime included, commerce continues.

Opportunity will be there for those wise enough to see them

How soon? I have been saying for almost a year now that it would probably be sometime in September

I am not afraid to make actual predictions

If I am wrong

Good for us

Happy Friday everybody

The U.S. has an economic crisis on its hands that one economist thinks is worse than the Great Recession.

The U.S. has an economic crisis on its hands that one economist thinks is worse than the Great Recession.

Over the past year, productivity has increased just 0.3 percent and a mere 0.5 percent over the past five years, during which the economy has struggled to escape the clutches of the financial crisis and the recession that supposedly ended in mid-2009.

The result has been growth in job creation but little corresponding rise in wages and, subsequently, living standards. It’s essentially been the economy’s dirty little secret even as Wall Street forecasters continue to project breakout growth that never seems to come.

“This topic is still getting almost no attention—particularly among presidential candidates—but there is a case to be made that the stagnation in productivity has been more damaging to the real living standards of Americans than the Great Recession,” Paul Ashworth, chief U.S. economist at Capital Economics, said in a note to clients. “Productivity growth is the primary driver of gains in real wages.”

Indeed, wage growth has been stuck around 2 percent or lower for pretty much all of the post-recessionary period. So while stock market investors enjoy the fruits of never-before-seen easy monetary policy—with the S&P 500 up about 210 percent since March 2009—it’s been a different story for much of the labor force.

“The longer this slump goes on, the harder it is to believe that the economy will just snap out of it,” Ashworth said. “For all the talk of secular stagnation and permanently weak demand, it may be supply-side problems that are the bigger problem.”

“The U.S. has an economic crisis on its hands that one economist thinks is worse than the Great Recession.

Over the past year, productivity has increased just 0.3 percent and a mere 0.5 percent over the past five years, during which the economy has struggled to escape the clutches of the financial crisis and the recession that supposedly ended in mid-2009.

The result has been growth in job creation but little corresponding rise in wages and, subsequently, living standards. It’s essentially been the economy’s dirty little secret even as Wall Street forecasters continue to project breakout growth that never seems to come.

“This topic is still getting almost no attention—particularly among presidential candidates—but there is a case to be made that the stagnation in productivity has been more damaging to the real living standards of Americans than the Great Recession,” Paul Ashworth, chief U.S. economist at Capital Economics, said in a note to clients. “Productivity growth is the primary driver of gains in real wages.” ()

Indeed, wage growth has been stuck around 2 percent or lower for pretty much all of the post-recessionary period. So while stock market investors enjoy the fruits of never-before-seen easy monetary policy—with the S&P 500 up about 210 percent since March 2009—it’s been a different story for much of the labor force.

“The longer this slump goes on, the harder it is to believe that the economy will just snap out of it,” Ashworth said. “For all the talk of secular stagnation and permanently weak demand, it may be supply-side problems that are the bigger problem.”

To be sure, there are some signs that wages are thawing. Unit labor costs are up 2.1 percent over the past year, providing some encouragement that inflation—the good kind—is on the rise.

However, the anemic production numbers triggered worry that the economy is no closer to 3 percent-plus gross domestic product growth than it’s been throughout the recovery period. As has been pointed out many times, this is the worst recovery since the Great Depression, with GDP unable to crack 2.5 percent for any calendar year since the crisis.

Some economists already are retreating from their growth hopes, with Ashworth now wondering whether “the economy’s potential growth rate appears to have fallen well below 2 percent.”

“This has massive implications for the economy,” said Stephen Stanley, chief economist at Amherst Pierpont Securities. “As people are finally realizing, it means that potential growth is sharply lower than where most economists were assuming up until recently. These data suggest that potential real growth is well short of 2 percent (possibly even below 1 percent), which explains why the labor market has tightened so much over the past five years despite what was considered at the time to be tepid GDP growth.”

Excerpted from CNBC, the rest is here: http://www.cnbc.com/2015/08/11/this-is-more-damagingthan-the-great-recession.html

Sometimes simple is better